Teacup Dachshund

All About The Teacup Dachshund

 

A teacup dachshund is not a special breed of dachshund. It is simply a dachshund whom the seller is trying to market as smaller than a normal-size dachshund. Teacup varieties are not new or special breeds of dogs and the “teacup” designation is not recognized by any of the major dog breed organizations. The AKC, for instance, recognizes one breed of dachshund. They can be shown in two divisions:

 

Miniature - for dachshunds under eleven pounds

Standard - for dachshunds between sixteen and thirty-two pounds

 

A teacup dachshund really doesn’t exist, but it is a way of marketing dogs so that they fit into a modern trend of so-called “designer” dogs. These dogs are smaller than normal and are meant to serve as status symbols. There really is nothing smaller than a toy dog, but breeders trying to create a teacup identity breed the smallest dogs in their litters with other small dogs. This is not considered by many to be responsible breeding. Anyone who charges more for a teacup dog is in it for the money and not for love of the breed.

 

That’s not to say there are no reputable breeders of teacup dachshunds. There are people who simply fell in love with this tiny dog and want others to be able to love a teacup dog as much as they do. But when you consistently breed for the one characteristic of being tiny, you are also going to create dogs that may have some health problems not inherently experienced by a normal-sized dachshund. Because so many of these teacup dogs are still in their first generation, no one really knows what health issues will be displayed over time nor can anyone say with certainty what to expect in terms of longevity.

 

Dachshunds originated as a hunting breed and this original instinct is not going to be suppressed by the breeding of smaller and smaller dogs. Dachshunds have their particularly short and long bodies for flushing out underground rodents. Dachshunds were bred to be bold and aggressive. They have the perseverance to stay with a task until it is finished. They don’t give up easily.

 

A teacup dachshund is also going to have the instinct to chase small animals that move. They are not afraid of what they consider to be a prey even if it is quite a bit larger than they are. If you have a pet mouse, guinea pig, ferret, cat or other small mammal, it will be in your teacup dachshund’s nature to give chase. Teacup dogs are bred to be companions and friends, but that doesn’t mean they can be lapdogs, lying around on a chair or bed all day and not need a significant amount of exercise.

 

The stubbornness that is inherent in a hunting dog translates into willfulness in the breed that becomes a great house or family dog. Some people find that a teacup dachshund is hard to train, especially when it comes to housebreaking them. You will have to be persistent in a positive manner, letting the dog know who is in charge. Teacup varieties demand a lot of attention. They cannot be left at home all day alone or they will display their displeasure in some way, such as going to the bathroom on the floor or chewing on furniture.

 

If you have fallen in love with a teacup dachshund and just have to have one, here are some tips to help you get through the process of buying the dog and choosing the right dog for you:

 

Make sure the breeder is reputable. If possible, and especially if they are on the premises, ask to see the puppy’s parents. The breeders should be happy to do so and both mom and dad should be very friendly and approachable.


Ask about any health problems either of the parent dogs may have, and make sure that both the parents and the puppy have a clean bill of health. Because a teacup dachshund is not a dog that can be registered by the AKC or other breed organizations, you will have no history you can trace and the dog will not need to meet the strict standards about not passing on genetic flaws.

 

Have your puppy immediately examined by a vet to make sure that all is well health-wise, even if the dog has already been vaccinated and had worm treatments.

 

If you have children, find out if the dog's parents get along with kids. Many teacup dogs love being adult companions, but can be irritable and snappy with children.

 

Dachshunds tend to gain weight and this is something you do not want to happen on a dog with a tiny frame. Feed your dachshund high quality food with lots of meat in it. Make sure the first word on the list of ingredients is meat. Furthermore, be sure to only feed in small portions.