Miniature Basset Hounds

Do Miniature Basset Hounds Exist?

 

There is a good bit of confusion when it comes to any discussion about miniature basset hounds. The miniature version of the basset hound breed is not recognized as a separate breed; in fact, the standard sized basset hound is often referred to as a miniature basset. To make matters even a bit more complicated, the basset hound exhibits a form of dwarfism, sometimes being referred to as a large dog on short legs.

 

There are plenty of advertisements offering miniature basset hounds for sale, and many times the hound in question, if a pup, will have parents that are about a foot in height and weight in the neighborhood of 35 pounds. The standard basset hound stands about 14 inches, and can weigh 5 to 10 pounds more. So what you are looking at isn't so much a miniature; it's simply a smaller version of the standard basset hound. There is almost certainly no such thing as a "teacup" basset hound; though if there is, it would be one cute little fellow.

 

Sweeping Away The Morning Dew

 

Besides its short legs, the defining physical characteristic of miniature basset hounds are a sometimes sad expression, the tricolor (from English breeding), and the long ears, which William Shakespeare noted in one of his plays with the phrase  “their heads are hung with ears that sweep away the morning dew.” Another characteristic of the basset hound is its nose, which is perpetually busy. It is said that only the bloodhound has a more sensitive sense of smell, among all of the dog breeds, than does the basset hound.

 

A Fine Sense Of Smell And Selective Hearing

 

The basset hound enjoys several of characteristics of the beagle, which may be a more familiar breed to many. Both will follow their noses, and both have a fine sense of selective hearing, which means you must keep them on a leash when not inside or in a fenced in area. The basset hound will follow its nose and completely ignore you if you try to call it back. Also like the beagle, the basset hound has a rather loud howl or bay, louder than the beagle perhaps. One other characteristic of note, especially if you are an apartment dweller -  Basset hounds, and miniature basset hounds as well, are renowned for their loud snoring, most likely louder than any other breed of dog. You'll want it sleeping in another room. Another thing to watch for is the tendency to drool when finished drinking out of the water bowl, often carrying quite a few drops of water into an adjoining room.

 

Superb Family Dogs

 

Miniature basset hounds, as well as the standard size hounds, make loving pets. They are exceedingly friendly and loyal, excellent with children, and probably the most calm and relaxed dog you're ever apt to meet. They are good watchdogs, as they will usually bark at strangers or intruders, but rarely do anything beyond that. They are even more social than most as far as meeting with other dogs is concerned. One sniff, and they'll go about their business, which often is following the trail of some invisible creature. They are an excellent hunting dog, and sometimes used for hunting rabbits. In Europe, they were at one time used to hunt badgers.

 

Miniature basset hounds do not require an excessive amount of exercise, but should be taken for a couple of walks on a leash each day. It's best to let them sleep inside at night (despite the snoring). They do not shed a great deal, and do not require constant grooming. Although, like most dogs, they'll enjoy the attention that a good grooming provides. Close neighbors had a basset hound a few years back. Its name was Muldoon. The name, for whatever reason, seemed to fit the dog perfectly.